Create artistic soft photos with any camera (even iPhone)

Create artistic soft photos with any camera (even iPhone)

Create blurry foregrounds with any camera (even iPhone)

My name is Simon Bolz, I’m a Professional Nude Photographer.

Since 2006 I specialize in shooting nudes. I shoot photo series for magazines and capture only what’s necessary not to overstimulate you.

Right now, I’m working on my first photo book which is being published in November 2014. For this book, I am travelling a lot which is why I have my tiny photo bag that you can see below.

I don’t like the act of travelling, but being elsewhere gives me a lot of inspiration and energy for my works.

You can also see my Medium Format gear here on InMyBag.net

Create blurry foregrounds with any camera (even iPhone)

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In My Bag

Create blurry foregrounds with any camera (even iPhone)

Links:

Professional Photographer: Yes

Create blurry foregrounds with any camera (even iPhone)

Create artistic soft photos with any camera (even iPhone)

Sometimes you want to add a bit more depth to your photo by creating a blurred foreground.  This effect is normally achieved with expensive lenses, but if you don’t have one this top tip using translucent objects is for you.

What you’ll need:

You can use pretty much any translucent object for it. As it is handy, I like to work with an optical glass.
I bought it at an optician and it doesn’t really matter how strong the glass is or if it is convex or concave.

Here’s some glass you could buy:  Optical Glass on Amazon

Basically anything will do. It can be a plastic bag or a drinking glass – check out the one below taking the idea further with a balloon

Create blurry foregrounds with any camera (even iPhone)

Creating the effect:

Place it in front of your lens and move it around to see how much you cover up and if you can catch some sunrays to either create a reflection or a light leak / burn / flare effect.

Create blurry foregrounds with any camera (even iPhone)

It happens that I use the effect to get rid of unwanted objects in my images.  For example on the first image in this article there are people sitting on the left side on a bank as it was shot in a public park.
Rather than photoshopping them out of my image, I went for the blurry foreground approach.

In the car shot I used two pieces of glass in the foreground to remove distractions whilst the camera was tripod mounted…go back and see if you can see them now you know they are there

It works best when shooting against the light or having the light come from the side.

 

Camera Phones:

This effect works best with traditional camera lenses, but the InMyBag.net editorial team just experimented with an iPhone 5 mounted on a Lollipod to keep it still and an old pair of glasses (lens removed)

The big difference is that the iPhone lens is different to traditional lens, so requires a slightly different approach.
Whereas Simon (pictured above) is only obscuring part of the lens with the glass, on phones you need to cover all of the lens.
You the search for  the effect by moving angle of the glass in relation to the lens.

We setup the camera with strong back light from the window, so initially the iPhone showed a badly lit shot.
TOP TIP: We tapped on the screen in the darker area to tell the iPhone what was important and it sorted out the lighting
(this is called spot metering and will make a massive difference to you photography!)

In the first shot you can see that there is unwanted detail on the right, the second shot show us introducing the lens

 

Create blurry foregrounds with any camera (even iPhone)

In the third shot, we experiment with the angle and in the forth we get rid of the unwanted details and achieve lens flair with our iPhone.

In the third shot, we experiment with the angle and in the forth we get rid of the unwanted details and achive lens flair with our iPhone.

 

My Philosophy

I own way too much of equipment. From time to time, I learned that less is more.

Nowadays, I prefer to shoot with daylight only. No flash, no reflectors, just available light. To hobbyist photographers my advice is not to be afraid of using high speeds such as ISO 800.

I am happy that more and more people want to learn how to photograph. There are so many talented people out there and their images enrich our lives. Always stay curious and share your good taste with others.